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20121201
20121231
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quorum call: mr. lieberman: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from connecticut. mr. lieberman: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that further proceedings under the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. lieberman: i thank the chair. mr. president, i have come to the floor to express my own sense of encouragement about the statements made this afternoon by president obama and senator mcconnell, which indicate that the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff are making progress. and we're not there yet, but they're making progress. and i'm really encouraged by that. i've heard over the last couple of days a familiar phrase invoked many times, and it is that "no deal is better than a bad deal." and i suppose it's often true that no deal is better than a bad deal, but in the case of the fiscal cliff, no deal is the worst deal because the government will go over the fiscal cliff and will take almost every american with us. almost every family that pays taxes now will pay higher taxes. people's jobs will immediately be p
cantwell against connecticut involved a group of witnesses that had gone into a catholic neighborhood in new haven on a sunday morning and began playing anti-catholic records on portable phonographs and distributing literature, and they were arrested for disturbing the peace and preaching without a permit, and appealed their case all the way to the supreme court which said that because connecticut said, well, individual city administrators would decide what a valid program was for religious organizations and would allow them or not on to the streets, they said that allows too much discretion by the state government, and they applied for the first time part of that first amendment, this time, the free exercise clause, as against the state of connecticut, and overturned their law that allowed city officials to license or not as they saw fit. >> host: and did that lead to any nationwide movements, or was it a well publicized case at the time? >> guest: it was a relatively well publicizedded case at the time. the really big movements came when jehova's witnesses, again, required laws to h
into a plane and it took an hour and a half to fled northampton to flood into the connecticut river. in the of the region's the 600 million gallons of water went through a williamsburg williamsburg, skinnerville and hated bill 15 minutes each. the worst industrial disaster at the time. over $1 million of property damage was sustained almost a hundred people left homeless and 139 were killed my input book is about the only village not be built skinnerville and william skinner. what set his story apart is the success and he achieved after the disaster. skinnerville had the worst destruction, it was obliterated from the face of the earth and a one. left, his house was the only one left standing and he lost more financially than any other individual he lost the equivalent of $35 million. he was ruined but because he made choices that nobody else would make he could come back. the other manufacturers in a the valley could not rebuild successfully. they had gone out of business, a bankruptcy, and sold businesses and left town. historian said three years later men of abundance could withst
interesting case called cantwell against connecticut's involved a group of what this is that had gone into a catholic neighborhood in new haven on a sunday morning and begin planning anticatholic records on a portable photographs and distributing literature and they were a arrested for disturbing the peace if preaching without a permit and they appealed their case all the way to the supreme court which said the because conn said individual cities administrators will decide what a valid program was for the religious organizations and would allow them or not onto the streets and they applied for the first time this time the free exercise clause against the state of connecticut and overturn the law that allowed the city officials as they saw fit. >> and did that lead to any nationwide movement or was it a well-publicized case? >> it was a relatively well publicized case, a really big movement came when the jehovah's witnesses again challenged law requiring school children to salute the flag every morning to say the pledge of allegiance and the first thing when they got to the supreme cou
, and the town took about an hour and a half to flood into the town and into the connecticut river. in the upper regions of the valley where the land is sweeper, that water went through the villages in about 15 minutes each. it resulted in the worst industrial disaster in american history at the time. over a million dollars worth of property damage was sustained, almost 800 people were left homeless x139 people -- and 139 people were killed. my book is about the only village that wasn't rebuilt, skinnerville. and the man at the center of that village, william skinner. and what sets skinner's story apart is the success he achieved after this disaster. now, skinnerville suffered the worst destruction of all. it was considered to have been obliterated from the face of the earth. there wasn't a brick left of skinner's mill, his house was very nearly the only one left standing, and he lost more financially than any other individual. in those 15 minutes, he lost the equivalent of $35 million. he was ruined. but because he was willing to make choices that no one else was willing to make, he was able to
board the am a&m amistad. the men were eventually sent to prison in connecticut where they awaited a trial heard by the supreme court. their case defended by john quincy adamss resulted in their release and return to africa. this is a little over an hour. >> greetings, everyone. greetings. good to see you here. thank you for coming out. i'd like to begin with very warm thanks to brian. brian, where are you? there he is back there. brian, has done a lot to make this happen. also thanks to anna for the generous introduction, and i'd say we should also give a round of applause to the staff of this museum, which keeps america's maritime heritage alive. [applause] >> now, i'm very happy to have a chance to talk with you this evening about a part of that maritime heritage which is not always included in america's history of the seas. i want to talk to you about this book that i've written, "the amistad bee bellon" and i want to remind everybody what happened in that story. just led me summarize what happened. the year is 1839. and this slave schooner, amistad, which in spanish means, "fr
in connecticut where they awaited a trial heard by the sprinkler. the case was defended by john quincy adams and resulted in the release and return to africa. this is a little over one hour. >> greetings, everyone. i would like to begin with a very warm thanks to brian. there is brian back there. he has done so much to make this happen. also, thank you to emma for the generous introduction. and also we should give a round of applause the staff of this museum's maritime heritage, who keeps his heritage alive. [applause] now, i'm very happy to have a chance to talk with you this evening about a part of that heritage, which is not only concluding america's history. i want to talk to you about this book that i have written, "the amistad rebellion." i want to begin by reminding everybody just what happened in that story. okay? does let me summarize what happened. the year is 1839. this sleek schooner, la amistad, which in spanish means friendship. it contains 53 enslaved africans. men and children, including three little girls. they are being carried from hosanna to another part of cuba where the
and wrote for the greenwich, connecticut, newspaper. and he came back and went to work for the voice of america, writing press dispatches to they very quickly was diverted to an effort to found a new veterans organization. it's kind of an interesting story, too, called the american veterans committee which was intended to be a new organization for turning veterans just some world war ii. they envisioned it as a progressive organization, integrated, unlike the vfw and the foreign legion. and the other one spent american legion. >> thank you. the american legion. anyway, that kept him occupied for a couple of years, and then he had a career in publishing. he was at the end of his life a freelance writer. he was a writer. the other two, hayward became an architect. he was a very good drawer. everywhere they went he would draw pictures. and he was an ornithologist vicki would draw pictures of birds. the third guy, bill, they came from remains, involving -- the defense department, so he, he was interested in politics all the way along and he stayed involved working for the american govern
. i yield the floor. mr. lieberman: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator connecticut. mr. lieberman: thank the chair. mr. president, in a short while the senate will vote on two nominees for service in the executive branch of our government, and i rise today to speak in support of one of those two, which is william b.a.e., -- william baer, who's been nominated to serve as assistant attorney general, managing the antitrust division of the u.s. department of justice. mr. president, i happen to have come to know bill baer personally, because practices flaw a firm with a very good friend and neighbor of mine here in washington. and in that remarks i can certainly testify to the -- and in that regard, i can certainly testify to the fact that he's an honorable, interesting, enjoyable person, but that alone doesn't qualify him to hold this high office. he has extraordinary experience. i would say that he is very, very widely acknowledged as one of the best antitrust lawyers in our country, and i would say that this nomination is really a merit-selection nomination. and i'll get
online. like us on facebook. next in light of the recent school shooting in connecticut on friday, award winning journalist david cohen presents his book columbine. the comprehensive account that took place in ninth. it's about forty minutes. dave cohen who are eric and dylan. >> the two killers at columbine. >> and eric was a psychopath and dylan was not. they were completely different people. and, you know, as i spent ten years on the book, and the question i get asked most often is why do d they do it. it took me a year to figure out it's in the wrong question. there's eric why he did it and there's dialynn. they are different people. do you want to talk about each one? eric was a psychopath. >> eric harris? >> yes. he was the mastermind of the plot. he spent a couple of years trying to figure out how he could destroy the entire world. that was his "fantasy" as a 16-year-old boy. wipe out humanitarian. only leave three or four or five people. the power of life as well as death makes it more powerful. a god can give life as well as take it away. and they are not delusional where they t
at that morning star next to the crescent moon. i thought kober. the connecticut regiment would have seen that here in brooklyn getting ready to go to white plains and again, it's dopey at least when i do it but suddenly it's that raw moment where wow, we are all tiny things. >> you talked about in your book how different areas have different revolutions but it's the same revolution but they go at it from different ways. one of the constants of the american revolution seems to be people's perceptions of washington and i'm just wondering, you stay away from the big figures and put the spotlight where it belongs on the landscape of the small people, but washington is a figure in your vote. do you come to any conclusions about this man? do come away liking him or not liking him? >> probably i mean -- >> you say he did and when the revolution. he managed not to lose up what to think is a great line. >> i think is a genius stroke. -had great conversations with artists about the revolution and there is this idea that art and ritual and reenactment, the things we used to engage with our past so
, why there's any doubt cast upon that law by the fact that connecticut has a different one or by the fact that great britain has a different one, i don't know. under our system texas is a sovereign state entitled to have it own public policies unless they run contrary to the constitution. and fact that they run contrary to connecticut and great britain is not contrary to the constitution. so i think, i think it's a hoax anyway because i think the court would decide the same way whether or not it cited foreign law. because i think the foreign law's in there for window dressing. >> host: the, the sort of the court in some sense what you're saying is justices may know what they want to do, and they're looking for support in whatever form they can find it, but it really doesn't have -- it's really not having an impact on what they actually decide? >> guest: i think that's right. >> host: um, i want to switch to a different, a different phase of your career. you served as solicitor general of the united states under president nixon. at the -- >> guest: mostly under ford. >> host
time has so much fun chatting with all of the ladies in live chat, and shelley daisy in connecticut, 111and gracie goose who is watching with her husband. has been up there, you do need to your sweetie a pair of the today's airing 7 and i promise you, she will love them.that is coming at and also face book. 6 c13 they're waiting for their herkimer christie is in the hsn check, she is monitoring twitter, and if you do want to check in with us and get connected, we'd love to see who is out there watching and shopping. the necklace6 c13 showing you, that is the favorite way to display the penance it is the multi strand necklace. $89.90. it does have a great classic by the way. this is a cylinder cylinder and it does look into it a slender ton and it does slip in and this is your classic and it does not, any pennant that you have will fit onto that and it will create a beautiful backdrop to your attendance. all of your penance will look prettier if you're wondering about this, that is a huge herkimer herkimer necklaces are coming up in my earrings that is the today's special coming up
independently across the colonies in connecticut and new york and pennsylvania and south carolina. and sam adams became the chief letter writer and political strategist and the story is told that a neighbor that had walked by his apartment at his house at 2:00 in the morning with see the light in his study up there and know that his pan was going scribble scroll trying to lead towards independence but sam adams really was, and of course he came along and did some remarkable things and even defended his wonderful biography and the british soldiers in the boston massacre because he believed that it was right a man of action and sam adams a man of principle. it was said of him she was the living embodiment of the principal. >> when my question is about the founding fathers. if you could go the way to pick one to go to the bar with which one would you go with and why? >> i will be honest with you. i think sam adams would be as important as he was because he didn't talk about anything but he believed in. i think i would probably pick somebody like cizik that had been he essentially a buccaneer, someb
, connecticut, 1837. c-span: what were his parents like? >> guest: his father was a very successful merchant, junius spencer morgan, who worked in hartford and then boston, and then moved to london in 1854 to become an anglo-american merchant banker. and he and pierpont, basically, were funneling european capital to the emerging american economy. i mean, we really were the emerging economy in the 19th century. he was very conservative, very upright, very much concerned to build an international banking dynasty that would rival the rothschilds and baring brothers, and he did. i mean, over the next 80 years, the morgan bank--especially in america--rothschild didn't really see what america was going to be. they had one man, august belmont, who was very good. but junius morgan staked the future on his son and on america. he was very, very supervisory and censorious and critical of his son, and determined that his son was going to be sort of an upright man with a solid-gold reputation. and pierpont was not--he was not following in the paternal footsteps early on. he was much more likely to take r
from bill in redding connecticut. heine. >> caller: hello. ron paul has called for the federal reserve to be shut down. one interesting reason i thought is that he wants to bring money back to congress whereby they can do so without charging interest to itself. this is where it was done prior to 1913. it was also something that thomas jefferson and andrew jackson warned about, having these big banks take over the creation of harmony. it basically creates the money in charging interest on money that they create and of nothing to begin with. that's my question. >> guest: you know, so i have not really been focusing on money. it was really outside the four corners of my job. but what i would do is recommend to just about anyone if i could plug in the book, i'm just reading white house. i actually think that they really do a wonderful historical accounts of what you're talking about and how it applies today, so i would just refer to them because they have higher degree of expertise and i do in that area. to say it's a wonderful book. >> host: here is neil barofsky best seller, bailout, an
driveway. i stood out on connecticut avenue one time trying to measure how long it takes for 140 vehicles to pass one point going 14, 15 miles an hour. i think it probably took an hour for our battalion, the yankees from new jersey, to arrive in the south through that old lady's backyard. but a few minutes later, maybe an hour later i had gone over to where the command was in the army, and my colonel came out and said you're going to be the security officer for james maine at this time. meredith. and then i picked, happened picked the best i could find; sharpshooters, self-control. and we were not to be too close to meredith, we were to be 30 seconds of him. and by radio. and i've often said that we could only catch the killer, we really couldn't prevent harm to him because, again, he was a allowed to freely walk across the campus back and forth. so that's how the peanut -- it was called the peanut patrol. hardly something ferocious like bear or tiger, this and that. but a person came by the first day and said what are you going to call your patrol, you have to have a name for it for radi
. >> host: last call comes from bill in redington -- excuse me, redding, connecticut. >> caller: hello. as you know, ron paul has called for the federal reserve to be shut down. one interesting reason, i thought, is that he wants to bring money back to congress. whereby they can do so without charging interest to itself. as was done prior to 1913. it was also something that thomas jefferson and andrew jackson warned about. having big bank takeover. he basically charged interest on money that they created out of nothing to begin with. >> guest: you know, the focus of money was really sort of outside four corners of my job. but what i would do is recommend to just about anyone, i am reading the white house is burning books and they do a wonderful historical account of what you're talking about. also how to place today. so i will defer to them because they hide a high degree of expertise in that area. i will just say the wonderful book. >> host: here is neil barofsky's bestseller, "bailout: an inside account of how washington abandoned main street while rescuing wall street." he has been
. the presiding officer: the senior senator from connecticut is recognized. mr. lieberman: i thank the chair. mr. president, i guess the good news is that i'm rising today not to speak about the fiscal cliff, but what i'm speaking about is not good news because it deals with the tragic events that occurred in benghazi, libya, on september 11 when terrorists took the lives of our ambassador chris stevens and three other brave americans who were serving us there. mr. president, i rise today along with the ranking member of the homeland security and governmental affairs committee, senator collins, to submit for the record the report that she and i have been working on with our staffs and other members of the committee following those events in libya. we called this report flashing red, a specialist report on the terrorist attack in benghazi. flashing red was a term that was used in conversation with us by an official of the state department, and it couldn't have been more correct. all the evidence was flashing red that we had put american personnel in benghazi in an increasingly dangerous situation
. wisconsin can have their bragging rights on cheese and colorado is where you take your skis and connecticut as lyme disease. [laughter] and another visa my prepared to sneeze but here we have the perfect height of trees. [applause] according to that theory romney was not a good candidate they should have been nominated somebody else. also a theory there were demographically behind and did not understand the people they were appealing to was no longer in the majority i tried to help them out when they were looking for a vice presidential candidate. i did a phone call to the cuisine diversity if engine doll or haley were put on the ticket republicans could entice voters who would like to eat food that has space and nastic with the voters to think a slice of white bread is the food that will always suffice. but then at the end of one chapter says with a retail politics we see no more the candidate since albert gore gore, as referred to him as a man like object. [laughter] without the common touch that was truman's they did not seem comfortable with humans. the small talk with the citizens appe
versus connecticut supreme court involving contraception. i guarantee you -- because i was there every republican candidate in the date has gone what? we learned a few weeks later that he had apparently been briefed and this was the beginning of the war on when to leave to women in which we discovered the law students that were not able to afford their own contraception have to have as a part of the new socialist model free contraception otherwise they will be deprived which was a symbol that we saw one article yesterday that "time" magazine maintain her as the person of the year conwell of course because after all she symbolized more than anyone else the total dishonesty with which the won the election. she's the perfect symbol of our incompetence. they clearly had a strategy, and george stephanopoulos launched a strategy. why would you want to set the date and invite the of 13? we will make a deal. sean hannity, rush limbaugh and comparable people to host the the dates. [applause] and yet we continue to pretend that the news media is neutral. the news media to send to the left. so yo
by these two guys, an irishman and a connecticut yankee. it's the history of the the city that's in the subtitle; fearless ethnics, political wizards, underrated scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. and, but it's a different town now. it's, i mean, it's no long orer just albany. albany, it's about five or six towns all put together. it's troy, it's schenectady, it's colony, it's saratoga. saratoga's only half an hour away. and these are great places to live and to see, and there's a lot to see in this town. town is coming back. it's also a great, a beautiful town. it's a really beautiful town. and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have that reputation anymore that stanford white thought it had. >>
the ladies side yard, that side driveway. eyes hurt out on connecticut avenue trying to measure how long it takes her 140 vehicles to pass one point going 14 or 15 miles an hour. i think it probably took an hour. the yankees from new jersey to arrive in the south through that old lady's backyard. a few minutes later, maybe an hour later, i had gone over to where the command was in the armory and my colonel came out and said, you are going to be the security officer for james meredith. and then i had to take the best i could find. sharpshooters, self-controlled and we were not to be too close to meredith. 30 seconds of him and on my radio and i've often said we can only catch the killer and we really couldn't prevent harm to him. again he was allowed to freely walk across across the campus back-and-forth. so that is -- it was called the peanut patrol. hardly something ferocious like a bear or a tiger but a person came by the first day and said what he is going to call your patrol? you have to have a name for it for radio purposes, then sterile, providence college 1961 was reading a peanut
for high school prep school in connecticut through yale law school and a day after taking the final exam he enrolled in the battle in the south pacific the battle of guadalcanal of the santa cruz where he wrote years later and not ship urging through the ocean praying that and cleaning the deck of the remaining of his shipmates and i think that is faith that sustained him not only in those tough times that in the joyful times and here was our guy that was at yale that invited dorothy day to come to yale to speak about the catholic worker and speak about the importance of also working together to help the poor. and that sustained as the father said through trials like the kennedy funeral to plan on will jack's futile. i love that story about his work in chicago where he worked to desegregate the catholic hospitals and the catholic high schools working with the cardinal and became good friends of martin luther king. in that story of him convincing senator kennedy to make that phone call is great because what ended up happening is kennedy campaign had been told that if he stayed positive but n
been sort of a committed newspaper man from the time he wrote in high school for the rich connecticut newspaper. and he came back and went to work for the voice of america, writing press dispatches. but he very quickly was diverted to an effort to found a new veterans organization. it's kind of an interesting story too called the american veterans community which was intended to be the new organization for returning vets just in world war ii. they envisioned it as a professional organization and was integrated into the vfw and the other one. >> the american legion. >> thank you. i said the foreign legion. the american legion. anyway that kept him occupy it for a couple of years. than he then he had a career in publishing. he at the end of his life as a freelance writer. he was a writer. the other two became architects. he was a very good drawer. he was drawing pictures and he was an ornithologist. he would drop pictures of birds. the third guy, al turkey, remained involved in international affairs and worked for the cia, the defense department so he was interested in politics all the
california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that are critical in the politics that develop, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative task to them. they tended to be oriented around history of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt, in the south and southwest that we see the rise of what we see by the 1970s is becoming to talk about as the religious right, the rise of evangelical involved in the clinical process in new and important ways. so thurmond was at the forefront of all of those issues in his own politics. national defense, he was a staunch anti-communist. he played an important role in right wing anti-communist populist politics in the late '50s and early 1960s. it's one of the things that led him to switch parties in 1964. he was a key figure in opposing labor unions. he did so alongside
connecticut supreme court suit involving contraception. i guarantee you, because i was there. every republican candidate and a debate has gone what? relearned a few weeks later the church i had been briefed that this was the beginning of the war on women in which we discovered $50,000 year law students unable to afford their own contraception have to have this part of the new socialist model free contraception or otherwise will be deprived, which then became a symbol which we saw one article yesterday in "time" magazine named her the person of the year. of course because after all she symbolized by than anyone else the total dishonesty with which they won the election. she's the perfect symbol of our incompetence. they clearly had a strategy of ensure stephanopoulos launched a strategy. by which you want to set up for debate and debate the other team and? will make a deal. the democrats will although sean hannity, rush limbaugh and three comparable people to host all their debates. [applause] and yeah, we continue to pretend that the news media is mutual. the news media is the last. and so i t
to be this political machine. but by and large it was run during these two guys in a connecticut yankee. it is the history of the city and the sub title, fearless as next and political wizard, underrated scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. but it's a different time now. i mean, it's no longer just albany. albany is about five or six townsel put together. it's story, schenectady, colony in saratoga. saratoga is only half an hour away. these are great places to live and to see. there's a lot to see you next time. it's also the beautiful town. it's a really beautiful town and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have the reputation anymore i had. >> according to author mike lofgren, "the party is over." how the republicans are crazy, democrats became useless and the middle class that shafted. mr. lofgren, how did the republicans go crazy? >> well, they go crazy when they became an apocalyptic home that lives in its own bubble. we have seen not in the last election. they simply could not believe the public polls, what they were saying that obama was probably going to win and most d
and a connecticut yankee. it's the history of the city that's in the subtitle, fearless ethnics, political wizards, underrated scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. and, but it's a different town now. it's, i mean, it's no longer just albany. albany is, it's about five or six towns all put together. it's troy, it's schenectady, it's colony, it's saratoga. saratoga's only half an hour away. and these are great places to live and to see, and there's a lot to see in this town. town is coming back. it's also a great, a beautiful town. it's a really beautiful town. and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have that reputation anymore that stanford white thought it had. >> albany, new york, is one of the oldest surviving settlements from the original 13 colonies and the longest continuously-chartered city in the united states. next, we hear from jack casey. his book tells the story of a mohawk woman born in 1656 who was recently named the first native american to enter saint hood. >> well, lily of the mohawks was a name that was given to a young woman, and ask she was baptized -- and she was bapt
's okay because in the middle of the night, there's this soldier from connecticut who was dumbing down help across the delaware, and will reach up and see this guy with a right to stick his arm out and grab him from his white horse. he told all his buddies this guys with this. leadership at all these elements. but anyway, washington's weaknesses make him just so much more brilliant. longmore, it should be noted, was a big activist in the handicapped rights movement, and i realized after i read this bugaboo, the kind of book where you're calling a to come and sing listen to this, listen to this. and i realized that he had typed the entire book -- [inaudible] and he had worked for disabled rights, and he, i him give a speech on video after i rea reae book but i realize hittite this, and he was giving a speech at another disabled rights, a memorial for another disabled rights person died and longmore said basically that this guy, you know, the movement made this great new. >> wanted to footnotes in the book made me read another book, which i hate reading books. but much more important we
newspaperman from the time he was in high school and wrote for the greenwich, connecticut, newspaper. and he came back and went to work, um, for the voice of america writing, writing press dispatches. he very quickly was diverted to an effort to found a new veterans' organization. it's kind of an interesting story too. called the american veterans committee which was intended to be a new organization for returning vets just from world war ii. and they envisioned it as a progressive organization. it was integrated unlike the vfw and the foreign legion and the other ones. >> host: the american legion. >> guest: thank you. i said the foreign legion. i knew that wasn't right. the american legion. anyway, it kept him occupied for a couple years. then he had a career in publishing, he was -- at the end of his life was a freelance writer. he was a writer. the other too, hayward cutting became an architect. he was a very good drawer. everywhere they went he was drawing picture, and he was drawing pictures of birds. and the third guy, bill dirkey, remained involved in international affairs. he worked
there connecticut or cyber. you have to know a lot about the client's business. you can't take the run of the mill lawyer and throw him in and expect him or her to do a good job i don't care how erudite they are if they don't really know how operations work and don't really know what the weapons capabilities are but the key here is the technologies need to assemble the facts and lawyers will provide the law and enter the process where you apply the facts as you do anything else in the practice of the law. i have never seen a situation where knowledgeable commanders really fought the law restrain them. secretary panetta talks about the rules of engagement, and part operational restraints and policy. i think my friend stuart, they dither over problems and most of them are lawyers but not practicing law and we need some decisive decisions, policy decisions. it is not the law or the lawyers per se. >> the last words as opposed to legal restraints. >> i agree with charlie. if you are a policymaker and you are not sure you have courage to make decisions about a particular issue the easiest thing in the
was in high school. the greenwich, connecticut newspaper. and he came back and went to work for the voice of america. but he very quickly was diverted to a new veterans organization. it is kind of an interesting story as well. it was integrated. >> the american legion? >> yes, that's right. the american legion. anyway, that kept him occupy for couple of years. and then he had publishing and at the end of his life was a freelance writer. he was a writer. the other two became an architect. he was a very good artist. he was an ornithologist and would draw pictures of birds. he became part of international affairs. so he was interested in politics all the way around. looking for the american government. those three were seriously injured in their time and north africa. which is, in a way, why they survived. >> rachel cox, this is her book, "into dust and fire: five young americans who went first to fight the nazis." she didn't want to give away too much of the ending, but just a little bit. rachel cox has another uncle who became rather notorious. >> archibald cox. everyone called him uncle b
the 1963 griswold v. connecticut supreme court or suit involving contraception. i guarantee you every -- because i was there -- every republican candidate in the debate is going, what? now, we learned a few weeks later that george, apparently, had been briefed that this was the beginning of the war on women in which we discovered that $50,000-a-year law students who were unable to afford their own contraception have to have as part of the new socialist model free contraception or otherwise they'll be deprived which then, of course, became a symbol -- time magazine may name her person of the year. well, of course, because after all, she symbolized the total dishonty with which they won the election. she's the perfect similar bomb of our incompetence. but they clearly had a strategy. and george stephanopoulos lawn of. ed the strategy. now, why would you want to set up a debate and invite the other team in? it would be like us saying we'll make a deal. if the democrats will allow sean hannity, rush limbaugh and three comparable people to host all their debates -- [applause] and yet we co
and a connecticut yankee. it is the history of the city in the subtitle, fearless that makes, political wizards, underrated scoundrels, and we still have a lot of those, but it is a different town now, it is no longer just albany. it is about five or six tones all put together. saratoga is homely half an hour away. these are great places to live. pat and to see. there is a lot to see in this town. the town is coming back. it is a beautiful town. it is a really beautiful town and a lot of people know it. it doesn't have that reputation anymore that stanford might. >> on a recent visit to albany, n.y. with the help of time warner cable booktv explore the literary and cultural atmosphere of the city. albany, known as one of the most populous cities in the u.s. in 1810 is home to several institutions of higher learning including the university at albany, state univ. of new york, the albany law school which is the fourth oldest law school in the u.s. and the albany college of pharmacy and health sciences. >> we are in the university of albany library department of special collections archives and th
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